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A Complete Guide to Cell Phone Etiquette

Cellphones are ubiquitous and research shows that although most users think they have good mobile manners, many people report being irritated or annoyed by the use of the phones in public places.

It is inevitable that we will be required to speak on the phone sometimes.

Some people are very confident speaking on the phone while others become a big ball of nerves at the thought.

It is helpful to have a plan for handling these situations so you can concentrate on what you’re saying, and so that others around you are not irritated by your awkwardness

According to www.inphomation.com, the website dedicated to all matters regarding public cell phone etiquette, the following are a few basic rules to follow.

In Public Places

Be Mindful of Your Surroundings You don’t want to be the source of your own stress, so forget about how you may look or what people may think of you for using your phone in public. As long as you are in a safe place and out of the way, who cares if you are on your phone?

Be Mindful of Others People may be on their cell phones too, so make sure you are using your phone in a way that doesn’t disrupt others in public. If you use your phone in a way that is annoying to others in public, you could become a target for criticism.

Cell phones are not the most subtle devices; keep you phone use brief and relatively quiet.

When you’re in public it’s best not to:

– Use speaker phone

– Send text messages

– Share personal information beyond the realm of what is acceptable in a face-to-face conversation

– Speak on your phone in a way that would disturb or disturb others in public.

In the Presence of Others

Be Mindful of the Person You’re Speaking With If you are in a meeting or with other people when talking to someone who is on the phone, take a moment to check with them if it is okay to talk to them while they are on the phone or to join in the call.

Be Professional Try to think of others and have good phone manners. If you need to make a call while you’re with other people, excuse yourself and use the bathroom or another room that is free of distractions.

In the Workplace

Be Mindful of the Needs of Others Ask permission before dialing and make only necessary calls in areas where others are present. If there is an option to leave the room, do so as professional manners require it.

Be Mindful of the Needs of the Company If you are in the office, be sure to keep your voices low and use common sense when speaking on the phone.

Quiet time should be while the phone is ringing. Do not talk on the phone in public places or in the presence of others. If you need to make a call take personal calls in private.

If you’re in the office, do not make personal calls while others are trying to work. If you are going someplace you aren’t able to take your phone call you need to let the person you are speaking to know you can’t stay on the line. If you are on the phone, stay on the phone.

In the Car

Be Mindful of It Don’t make calls or listen to your voicemail while driving. There are apps that allow you to listen to phone calls on your Bluetooth or speaker phone, and there are apps that let you text hands-free.

If your phone rings, pull over first. If you are in a car, keep your actions courteous. Remember to keep voices low and no talking in the streets or in public. If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand. While you’re in your office, don’t talk on your phone in the streets or in public.

If you are at lunch or out to dinner, take calls in private or ask your party if it is okay. If you are in a car, keep your actions courteous. Remember to keep voices low and no talking in the streets or in public. If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand. If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand.

In the Visual Environment

Be Mindful of the Person You’re Speaking With If you are in a meeting or with other people when talking to someone who is on the phone, take a moment to check with them if it is okay to talk to them while they are on the phone or to join in the call.

Be Mindful of Privacy and other People’s Needs You know about speaking in public and that it is best to keep private conversations to a minimum or not speak on the phone at all. However it is also etiquette to avoid the spotlight when speaking on the phone on the street or in public places.

Be Mindful of the Private Conversation If you are in the middle of an important phone conversation and the person you are talking to or others you are interacting with would like to talk to you, or if you need to pause for personal reasons, it is polite to acknowledge the other people and take a moment away.

If you are at lunch or out to dinner, take calls in private or ask your party if it is okay. If you are in a car, keep your actions courteous. Remember to keep voices low and no talking in the streets or in public. If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand. If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand.

Consideration of Others

The most important rule to observe when using your cell phone in public is to think twice. Refrain from using your phone in public places or in the presence of others. If you are in a car or in the office make sure you have the permission of the person you are speaking with before you bring your phone to the surface. A phone call does not usually need to be made in the presence of another person unless it is part of your work. Remember to keep everything you say professional and keep voices in check when using your cell phone in public.

The most basic phone etiquette you will need to know when using your phone in public is when it is okay to use it and when it is not. You should never use your phone in public places or in the presence of others.

If you’re at lunch or out to dinner, take calls in private or ask your party if it is okay. The phone call itself is the least important part of the call.

Best to practice the following:

When in a public place, leave people alone who are not expecting your call. If you are continuing a conversation on the phone and a colleague or other person needs your attention, ask first. If you are in a car, keep your actions courteous. Remember to keep voices low and no talking in the streets or in public. If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand. If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand.

If you are going to be in spaces where you can’t take calls, tell the person you are talking to beforehand.

Make sure you do your homework before making your own calls and ask the person you are with if you can make your call. It is best not to take calls from people you don’t know.

When using your phone, it’s best to be considerate to nearby people. If you are trying to talk privately to someone, take the phone off speaker. If you’re in a meeting or with others, wait to dial numbers or look at your screen

It is the fault of your caller to tell you that they’d like to talk on the phone and then not be able to wait until you’ve finished the conversation you are in the middle of.

Active listening is the best way to show respect for the person you’re speaking with and totally immerse yourself in your conversation. The person you’re speaking with should feel like they are the only person on the face of the earth and that your focus is solely on them.

Dick Cavett said “I can’t imagine a human activity to which more rules should be applied than telephoning.”

If you are at lunch or out to dinner, take calls in private or ask your party if it is okay. Remember to keep voices low and no talking in the streets or in public.

Do not make personal calls while others are trying to work. Avoid speakers when you’re in public. When in a car, let the driver concentrate. Act courteously in a conversation. Keep voices low and the number of people in the conversation, also phone calls short. If you can’t be courteous to others, turn your phone off or put it on voicemail when you’re with them.

Be careful to put your phone in a private place when you are in public. Many people feel a violation when a conversation is interrupted by a phone call in public. Half the world is likely to judge you for not putting your phone away.

The best time to call family or friends is not at work.

When you say goodbye to your phone call, go find the person you were talking to before you forgot about them.

Busy signals are annoying when you aren’t expecting them. Use voicemail if your call is not urgent.

Remember that when you make a business call, you are representing your company. Use phone calls for business only, unless the person you are speaking with requests to include others.

Cell Phone Etiquette: Conclusion

Use your phone in a public place. Our guest author says the most basic phone etiquette you will need to know when using your phone in public is when it is okay to use it and when it is not. You should never use your phone in public places or in the presence of others.

The most basic phone etiquette you will need to know when using your phone in public is when it is okay to use it and when it is not. You should never use your phone in public places or in the presence of others.

If you’re at lunch or out to dinner, take calls in private or ask your party if it is okay. The phone call itself is the least important part of the call.

When making a business call remember to use phone calls for business only, unless the person you are speaking with requests to include others. If you are in a car, keep your actions courteous. It usually does not need to be made in the presence of another person unless it is part of your work. Remember to keep everything you say professional and keep voices in check when using your cell phone in public.

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