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Business Etiquette In Portugal

It is useful to know about different cultures ‘ business etiquette and habits beforehand. Perhaps use the information as a guide for your next trip abroad.

Summary:

Portuguese are a proud people and there are clear cultural differences to be found between Portugal and the United Kingdom. The Portuguese people have a positive attitude to life and tend to try to be cheerful and friendly. They believe it ‘s important to find good balance between work and play so that they can avoid burnout.

Businessmen are generally very formal in their approach although they are hospitable and have a long memory, which is why one should be very polite while at first being cautious.

The meeting should be short and simple so that the two of you can get to know each other. The meeting is the time to check if there are also moral aspects that are important to you, whether your counterpart is trustworthy and whether he/she is a pleasant person you would like to do business with. This is not the time for business laces.

The presentation is the most important element of the meeting. Concentrate on gathering the information you know the other party will be interested in. The more you know the other party, the more confident you will feel.

There are many ways of presenting yourself in a business meeting. If you are aware that your counterpart is interested in you and your company, then you may want to make your presentation more informal. Without being arrogant, you want to appear to be open and confident. Be fair with the truth and clearly point out the decisions that need to be taken.

The Portuguese have a dream of being surrounded by family, friends and good food and wine. It is perfectly possible to organise a business lunch, meeting or dinner while you are in Portugal. However, you should realise that the Portuguese do not have business lunches that have an open end, as they believe these can wither the business relationship. These are more of a social meeting between people who have a future financial relationship to create.

It is important to know that the Portuguese can be very liberal and trustworthy. However it is also good to let them know you are equally open and honest. Showing trust and confidence is important in business.

It is a great advantage to have friends or contacts in Portugal. Knowing your counterpart and his/her family is a strong way of creating good relationships. It is a faulty to conceal your contacts as you can easily show your true intentions, and this is great for the future.

Specifies:

Use in Portugal : Good examples of the above will make sure your presentation to a Portuguese colleague is listened to attentively and you are taken seriously.

Etiquette or Rituals: A small gift or a printed card with greetings on it is very nice.

Language Used: Portuguese is spoken by all Portuguese people. Due to Portugal ‘ s multicultural history, there are people who speak the following languages alongside Portuguese: French, English, German, Italian and African languages such as Swahili, Ewe and Yoruba.

Greetings:

  • Good morning/afternoon is said while shaking hands.
  • Goodbye is said in a similar way.

First introductions:

  • For an introduction, a handshake is appropriate; the important thing is to look the other person in the eye.

Initial conversation:

  • The initial conversation is formal.
  • Language is spoken slowly and clearly without regional accents.
  • Greetings and farewells are important.
  • Always be positive, and if possible complement the other person.
  • However, be careful of over-complimenting.
  • Be prepared to listen to your counterpart and to say as little as possible.
  • Show a genuine interest in the other person and ensure that your knowledge of their business is thorough.
  • If you know the person before the meeting, check if they have an assistant.

Business Relationship:

  • In business meetings, take an active part in the conversation. Never be too nervous to say something or to make a proposal.
  • Do not be afraid of disagreeing with the Portuguese.
  • If you are acting as an intermediary between two companies, stress the positive aspects of both your proposals.
  • Do not make an offer in writing unless expressly requested because you are dealing with a non-logical person.
  • If you have been be forthcoming with the personal facts about your company, reciprocate.
  • Show that you are interested in the Portuguese culture, but do not mention other countries.

Being given a business card:

  • Business cards are exchanged when the other person checks yours.
  • Do not present your card until your counterpart gives you one.
  • Do not comment on the card.

Sitting, body language and gestures:

  • Do not appear nervous.
  • Make sure your posture and gestures always convey confidence and authority.
  • Do not cross your arms.
  • Always sit straight in your chair.
  • You may sit comfortably unless the person you are meeting errs.
  • If you are female, do not show perfume or apply makeup in public.
  • Do not allow yourself to gesture much.
  • Smoking: There is a smoking ban in public places in Portugal but in certain restricted places a person can smoke.
  • Considerations : If you take someone to a business meeting and you need to prepare the meeting, do not be afraid to prepare your partner too. Have the agenda ready but do not force it on your counterpart.
  • Dress: Casual wear is very much the rule. You need to be smart-casual.

Electronic equipment:

  • Use of electronic equipment makes a meeting interactive and personal.
  • Not to look at the phone or write messages during a meeting.
  • Make sure any earplugs are out.
  • These are recommendations and should not be interpreted as mandatory or official.

Portugese Greetings

  • Bom dia (morning): The most common greeting.
  • ‘ Boas-tardes (afternoon): the standard greeting; ‘ bons dias ‘ is used informally, when used with ‘ boa tarde ‘ can be confusing.
  • ‘ Boa noite (night): Used before going to sleep.
  • ‘ Tchau (see you): A light farewell, strong enough to be used any time of the day.
  • ‘ Deus te acompanh (God go with you): Goodbye for some, when used in various formal settings is considered a strong and formal goodbye.
  • ‘ Cumprimentos (saying): Left-handed compliment for a person, somewhat akin to British English’s ‘cheerio’ or US English’s ‘howdy’, this is used at the door.
  • ‘ Tchau (see you): Used as a greeting in many situations; used more often than ‘ boa tarde ‘ or ‘ bom dia ‘.
  • ‘ Tudo bem?: ‘ All right? ‘; ‘ Ola, tudo bem? ‘ (Hello, everything all right? )
  • ‘ Well? ‘; ‘ Ola, tudo bem? ‘ (Hello, everything all right? ) ‘ Tudo bom? ‘: ‘ Everything good? ‘
  • ‘tudo bem?’ (Hello, everything all right? ) ‘ Everything good? ‘ ‘ Onde vais? ‘: ‘ Where are you going? ‘; ‘ Onde vais? ‘ (Hello, where are you going? )
  • where are you going? ‘ ‘ Hello, where are you going? ‘ in Lisbon area and South: ‘ Onde vais? ‘
  • ‘ Onde vais? ‘ ‘ Onde vais? ‘ in the North, and ‘ Onde vais? ‘

Your meeting in Lisbon Business Palce

The Portuguese people have a positive attitude to life and tend to try to be cheerful and friendly. They believe it ‘s important to find good balance between work and play so that they can avoid burnout. Portuguese are a proud people and there are clear cultural differences to be found between Portugal and the United Kingdom.

The Portuguese people have a positive attitude to life and tend to try to be cheerful and friendly. They believe it ‘s important to find good balance between work and play so that they can avoid burnout. Portuguese are a proud people and there are clear cultural differences to be found between Portugal and the United Kingdom.

The Portuguese business culture is a bit more formal and business-like in style than the British culture, although it shows a bit more relaxed and friendly attitude in recent years and that can be noticed in Lisbon.

The Portuguese business culture is a bit more formal and business-like in style than the British culture, although it shows a bit more relaxed and friendly attitude in recent years and that can be noticed in Lisbon.

Don ‘ t be pushy and aggressive in your business ways. The Portuguese do not appreciate it.

The Portuguese dislike it when they are continuously let into; show respect.

Be as clear as possible about the business being discussed.

Avoid taking over a situation and state your business in a clear and efficient manner.

The Portuguese pay great attention to visual manners. Dress smartly. Always have a good business card; they are used in all situations and presentation is very much appreciated.

Remember, for the most part, make your initial meeting with the business you want to contact, more of a ‘handshake ‘ rather than a ‘sell ‘ approach.

Portugal Business Law and Customs Union

The Law on Associations (Decree-Law No 274/93, 16 December) is the legal instrument for the creation of companies. The registration of Associations requires the registration of its Board of Directors and shareholders.

Companies are required to apply for registration with the Commercial Registry Office (CRI) within 30 days after its creation.

A company is required to register its Board of Directors and shareholders in the Commercial Registry within 30 days from the date of registering with the Commercial Registry (CRI).

Business and Private Companies

Private Limited Companies:

There are two types of limited companies in the Portuguese Business Culture:

  1. Sociedades Simples (solares)
  2. Sociedade Anónima (S. A.)

The capital for Sociedades Simples is composed of the amount of authorized investment (the minimum authorised investment is € 100.00) divided by € 100.00. In addition, the company is required to maintain a minimum amount of capital that must exceed the amount of the dividends. At the same time, if a company has credit, the increase is not taken into account for calculating the value of the capital. However, capital may not be negative and companies are not permitted to lend money to third parties.

Company documents are required to be in Portuguese, even where a foreign language is legally used in the Headquarters.

In the case of the same, the use of both languages in the company documents should be specified by the third parties.

The minimum share of capital in these companies is € 100.00, irrespective of the number of shares subscribed by individuals and legal entities (either individuals or legal entities).

  • The shares may be issued in a single class or multiple classes.
  • If shares are issued in a single class, the same with a value of at least € 100.00 each.
  • If shares are plural, each class should not exceed 20% of the total of the share capital.
  • The distribution of profits can be in cash or in kind. Only the following profits are excluded:
  • Profit from the withdrawal of investments in the company (e.g. shares in the company).
  • Profit to be withdrawn within a period of 3 years of formation of the company.
  • Profit to be withdrawn in cash in the amount of up to 50% of the subscribed value of any share.

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